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Classic Review Edition
Page 1

I used to own this game. It wasn't quite worth what I payed for it. When I had the game, I didn't play it that much. Sure, if I understood what I was supposed to do in the game, there may have been a bigger spark of enjoyment.

The controls were cocky, but whatever my purpose was in the game was wrong! I remember heading into Biff's Bar, and trying to collect chunks of food during a certain amount of time just to win a trophy!?!?! What the heck?

The sound was not as good as it could have been. Sure, the odd beep may thrill the average Joe Videoblow, but it's not good enough for me. Give me the hippest and funkiest music you got!

This was the sequel to the original game Back to the Future. I've played the original Back to the Future, and it's the same thing, only with more of an ultimate purpose than its predecessor.

Gameplay was rather poor, but that does add to the challenge. You are a very plain character in no way connected to the resemblance of Michael J. Fox wearing a powder blue shirt. You jump over and on enemies through the 'city', as well as hop through portals to other times. Whenever you lose a life, that Back to the Future blue car drops you off again. Meh.

I give this game 4.7 out of 10 as a final score. It's an okay game for a rainy day if you've played everything else, but if I only had 1 game to play, it would definitely not be this one. But hey, maybe it's closer to its movie counterpart than I thought; I have never had the courage to watch the full movie.

FINAL SCORE: 4.7/10

UPDATED COMMENTARY:
Wow. What an awful review. I'm quite embarrassed. I even spelled "paid" wrong. What a moron I was. In any case, this short little review is very straightforward, and I still agree with what I said, although I feel as though the score is a bit high. I do remember spending a few quality 15-minute periods playing this game when I was a kid, but I can't seem to enjoy it for that length of time anymore...

Sometimes it's sad that many games don't make it past Japanese shores. This includes a vast number of Goemon games, the Gundam Wing series, and every single Sailor Moon game on the Japanese market. However, it can be said that some great games are those that we can't play. One such game that never made it to our shores, but is a heavily addictive experience, is Bishojo Senshi Sailor Moon: Another Story.

Bishojo Senshi Sailor Moon: Another Story, the lengthily-titled game in the hefty Japanese-only Sailor Moon series, should have tapped into North American stores. It is a very colourful and, as I said before, addictive game. It is an RPG in nature, with several chapters in the game following the adventures of the Sailor Senchi (the big Sailor Moon team). It has all the basic features of an RPG -- experience, items, turn-based battles...the works! Of course, the game does have a high difficulty level, but that shouldn't stop anybody from enjoying the game (because the difficult parts eventually get easier as your Experience Levels increase)!

The story here gets very thick after a while. Apparently, a group of evil girls from the future want to control the future and, more importantly, Destiny itself. They can only do this by getting their hands on the Ginzuishou, the Mystic Silver Crystal that guards those who keep it in their possession. So, they attack the Juuban district just to get it. The group of girls end up injuring Tuxedo Kamen (also called 'Tuxedo Mask'), and the only way to revive him is using the power of four jewels found across the world. The story gets very complicated, and you might get lost at some point, but it's okay -- the game is very linear anyway.

Most likely, players will find that the difficult parts are at the beginnings of the four sections of Chapter 2, in which individual Sailors must battle enemies but they are weak. However, you will eventually get back on track if you are able to fight single-enemy battles when you are weak. Once you get stronger through raised experience levels (meaning increased strength, defense, etc.), you can battle the tougher enemy parties and bosses. Some level building is not only recommended, but often required. Weak players will not survive in this game. Strong players will prevail. The key here is not just strength, but defense, so if you keep these high, you will certainly do well in this game.

Graphics are cool in games. It's interesting to see facial pictures (mugshots) when the Sailor Senchi are talking. However, the other visuals are not quite stunning, but will suffice. The backgrounds can get bland after a while, and the enemy sprites are merely satisfactory. The actual character sprites themselves are also decent. The sound is another story (no pun intended there). The tunes in the game are definitely hummable, and they will entertain you past the likes of the graphics. Some songs are melancholy while others pep up the situation. In all cases, listen to the music .... well, except for the extremely annoying theme in Canada -- what a pain in the neck.

If you import a copy or buy one online, it will be in Japanese, so unless you are fluent in that language, the game is very hard to understand. A fan translation has been made from Japanse to English for this game. Play this title, and you will instantly become a Sailor Moon fanatic. That's not a bad thing.

FINAL SCORE: 7.9/10

UPDATED COMMENTARY:
It's a shame that Bishojo Senshi Sailor Moon: Another Story was never released overseas because this ended up being one of the most interesting RPGs for the SNES. Yeah, we have Final Fantasy VI and Chrono Trigger, but this RPG was just as entertaining, even though I had very little background in Sailor Moon lore to work off of. I created a rather stiff summary of the plot, but it's fairly accurate and it's pretty much all you need to know. This may have been one of the better reviews for GamerBase that I had written, far superior to the shorter reviews (Back To The Future II & III, Mega Man 3), and I'm not ashamed to post this one!

Check out our more recent and thorough review of Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon: Another Story!


You really gotta hand it to this guy. He's one of the few video game characters that has managed to survive the test of time without subjecting himself (or herself) to any crappy games (as in Mario to Mario Teaches Typing). Bomberman also gets the award for appearing on the most consoles ever. He has appeared in games on fifteen different systems. That's amazing. One of his most recent excursions was that of his new Game Boy Advance game, Bomberman Tournament.

Bomberman Tournament's name may throw some people off. It sounds like it's a multiplayer game only. However, although this DOES have a strong multiplayer engine to it, there is a Quest mode where you can play as Bomberman in order to find your buddy Bomberman Max, who oddly disappeared. I don't know about everyone else out there, but I, for some strange reason, prefer Bomberman single-player quests than the super-hyped multiplayer mode.

Within the single-player Quest mode, you play as the great white Bomberman, who will embark on a lengthy journey to find Bomberman Max. I said that already, but you may have forgotten. What I didn't say, is that Bomberman Max was on a secret mission on the planet Phantarion. Bomberman now must find him, but must infiltrate the fortresses of several robotic beings to find him (you may remember these beings from Super Bomberman 2). Along the way, you can pick up as many as ten different types of bombs, as well as up to 25 different creatures called "Karabons". Each Karabon holds a different purpose (for example, the first Karabon you pick up will give you the ability to warp to any town you've already visited). You can save pretty much anywhere, but if you die, you can start back where you saved. Of course, if you die anywhere inside a dungeon, you will have to start at the beginning. Oh well, all the changes you made are still there. Not a big deal, baby. I've read that people think the Quest mode is crappy, but I don't believe it's too bad. Sure, a little more action wouldn't hurt, but that's life.

Everyone prefers the multiplayer mode. Guess what -- it hasn't changed in ten years. It seems that Hudson Soft has realized that once you've found a sure-fire hit, stick with it. So if you have any other Bomberman game with this multiplayer feature, why would you want another one? Perhaps the portability of this version will perk your interests. Anyway, the multiplayer mode is where you get to blast your friends (or the computer if all of your buddies bought a big clunky console instead...I won't mention its name **cough**XBOX**cough**) away with bombs in a big arena. Sounds like a drag? Well, apparently it's a hit, and I can kinda see why. Everyone wants to explode their friends, but can't cough up the green to buy enough bombs to do the job. For only the cost of one cartridge, four people can detonate each other! What fun.

Graphics look to be slightly above the lines of a Super Nintendo game, but then again, it's hard to make out the atom-thin details on the characters and setting, but it suffices anyway. Graphics are bright and clear (well, maybe not that underwater area -- you need a good light). Explosions are very crisp though, and the introductory graphics are kind of cool, with the exception of the dorky Professor. What's up with his eyes?

Blast! Boom! Ploink! Everyone loves sound effects. So do I! The music is not memorable, but is cheery and will keep you in a good mood, even if you hate the game. Sound effects are there, but they aren't a sufficient part of the game. That's probably a good thing, because they aren't plentiful anyway.

Bomberman has made another excellent appearance on yet another console. There aren't any plans for a sequel yet, but if there is, I'll consider thinking about possibly buying it. I'm just looking forward to Megaman Battle Network 2 a little more though. Anyway, if you like him or if you hate him, Bomberman is still going to be around for a while. Learn to live with it.

FINAL SCORE: 8.9/10

UPDATED COMMENTARY:
Actually, during the time period when I created this GamerBase tribute feature, I was also playing through Bomberman Tournament, and I cannot deny the charm that this game has. Yes, it may get repetitive after a while, and the mini-missions may be just downright silly (take flour to a neighbouring town, for example) but you still will want to play it anyway. I also delivered a bit of a low blow to the XBox in this review, which may or may not be fair, but it seems that XBox 360 owners were given an even lower blow years later in the form of Bomberman: Act Zero. What an insufferable game. Finally, I have to wonder why I had to use the terms "blast", "boom", and "ploink" in a review. That sounds unprofessional.

Thanks to one of my friends, I got to test out an OLD Intellivision II system, which, if you didn't know, was released before the NES (thereby making it an OLD game system). Now, my friend also had a big box filled with these Intellivision games! A lot! She fished out the best (in her opinion) game in the box -- Burgertime.

So I took the controller, which consisted of 12 buttons (0-9, and clear, and an enter button) and a rotatable pad that moved your character. And I started to play this game....my, my, I thought, it's a tough game! But steering your fat chef character around isn't the easiest task imaginable.

The goal is to create four burgers at the bottom of the screen, by walking around the burger pieces on the screen and making them drop onto the next level down, and keep doing that until you get the piece on the burger pile. And of course, all the pieces of the burger are on screen at the same time, so it doesn't matter which burger you start with, or which piece you drop next. And of course, you're also trying to avoid walking eggs, sausages, and pickles. Your weapon is pepper spray (not my weapon of choice, but it works), and it only stuns the enemy for a short time. But other ways of killing the enemies are letting them ride on the burger piece as it falls, or getting squashed by a burger piece.

Graphics? Uh.... well, for 1982, they're good graphics, but now, I think it's just too old to be popular. And in the NES remake, it wasn't that much better.

Sound? Well, there's a bit of funky music, but the pepper spray noise and the burger piece drop sound leave something to be desired.

Replayability? Try to beat the level your game ended at, that's all the replayability you get! There's no save option! There's no need for a save option!

I gave this game 4 out of 10 because I'm feeling generous. If you want to play it, go ahead. If you don't want to play, don't go ahead. But Burgertime can be a fun game, if you have a lot of time, because those walking sausages are just plain ANNOYING!!!!

FINAL SCORE: 4.0/10

UPDATED COMMENTARY:
I still remember playing that Intellivision, but unfortunately I haven't talked to her since that summer, so I really haven't had much of an opportunity to replay this experience. But what I DO remember is just how irritating Burgertime is, no matter what platform it is on. You're always being chased by breakfast meats and yet you still have to survive long enough to walk over layers of a hamburger to make it fall onto the pile below until you have complete burgers. Besides being a stupid premise, it's just not fun. It's stressful! It's kind of like Pac-Man, only with more edible visuals.

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